2018/11/16

“Who is Demoscener?” - What I’ve learned from interviewing them




For the past 5-6 years, I’ve had occasion to peek into the little-known computer subculture called “demoscene”. I’ve seen their work, I’ve been to their events, and I’ve talked to some people who drive this culture. In this post, I’m going to share my view and what I’ve learned in this culture.

I won’t explain what the demoscene is here, so please refer to this page for that details.


How I discovered demoscene

I should first clarify that I am not a computer enthusiast: I do use computers a lot for my work and for fun, but my job and interests have been about juggling natural language and not computer language. I’ll be ecstatic when I see beautiful combination of words, but I’ve been trying to stay away from lines of numbers because they look complicated. I can’t code, I can’t make music and I can’t draw anything properly – Basically I’m a complete outsider to this culture.

First time I ran into the word “demoscene” was a bit over 10 years ago. I discovered this culture through online articles and mail magazines published back in 90s, the time considered to be the golden era of demoscene. The articles covered its event which was packed with teenage computer enthusiast, and their weekly mail magazine shared their production diary, tutorials, event reports… In short, their youthful days devoted to computer programming were encapsulated in these documents.

I read on thinking “Who are these people?” These people were spending almost all their waking hours for programming, and I just couldn’t understand why they were so obsessive about it. To be honest, my initial thought was that they’re just crazy or “oh, so that’s what people call ‘nerd’ ?” But their articles were interesting to read and the fact that they all somehow sounded like they were having the time of their lives was intriguing, so I slowly started to explore this culture.

Looking back, what interested me first was not the demos or culture itself but these strange people called “demosceners”.


How I started to do interviews

I said “exploring” but it was more like a casual googling whenever I recalled it or heard about a topic related to computer programming. For years on and off I’d read some documents around the culture and watched some demos on YouTube, computer or DOS emulator, but I felt this culture was protected by jargons and 90s style website (they scare me with browser warnings – because it contained exe file, now I know) and I really couldn’t get a whole picture.

Then one day, while I was doing one of those casual surfing, I found a documentary called “Moleman 2 – Demoscene – The Art of the Algorithms”. This was made for viewers with no knowledge of this culture, thus it contains all the basic information you need to know before tapping into this world. I watched it and thought it’s great, and wished if I could have watched something like this when I first heard about demoscene. Since they’re looking for scripts in multiple languages, I decided to give Japanese subtitle thinking this might help someone like me. And once it came out, I got some feedback from Japanese demosceners via Twitter. I asked one of them if I could send a few questions, and the interview series started.


Editing the interview...


I’ve done 13 interviews with demosceners up to this point. All the interviews except one were conducted via email. I sent them questions and they replied me with answers. (And the exception was done via Skype chat.) I did edit to create flow in the text, but I tried not to touch their words much to show their messages and personality more directly. I wanted to read something not too technical (because I can’t understand) and I’m happy about how things turned out, but I’m also glad that many people enjoyed them as well. The best compliment I’ve heard so far was “My mom enjoyed it” :)



Appeal of demoscene to outsider’s eyes

Apparently, the strongest appeal of this culture is an artwork called “demo”. Demo is an execution file, and you can experience real-time generated visuals and audios by running it on your computer. Demos are created using loads of different and advanced technologies… but the great thing about this demo is that you can enjoy it without technical knowledge. You don’t need to know what GPU stands for or what Ray tracing means and, not sure what creators would think but, you don’t even need to download the file and run it on your computer – you can just watch it on YouTube. (In fact, it looks better and smoother that way if your computer is for basic tasks.)

Sure, some demos are very technical looking, but you can enjoy most of them like you enjoy music videos or short clips of arts and design. Their often abstract and meticulously created visuals are entertaining and inspirational and it can help you to see or imagine things from different angle, just like contemporary arts do. And if you live far away from the computer graphics field, you will find some very unexpected.

Not just visuals, but the music used in demos are equally appealing. Most of them were originally made only for this purpose, so you can enjoy the matching mood with sound. And you’ll be surprised by their quality and a wide variety of genre. There are vocals, hip-hop, jazz, samba, pianos… but if I can share my very personal impression… if your favorite music falls between LFO and Squarepusher and you don’t know demoscene, you’re missing quite a lot.

And there’s another thing which seems like an appeal of demoscene to outsiders. And that’s people involved in this culture – in other words “demosceners”. You can learn so many things from their approach and way of thinking, especially if you consider yourself a person which has nothing to do with this subculture.


So, what did I learn?

So here I’m going to share with you what I’ve learned about demosceners through interviewing them, talking to them and visiting demoparties.

In honor of the great host of our time, I’d like to present this in David Letterman’s top 10 list’s way.



10 things I’ve learned about Demosceners



10. “Demoscener” is an earned title.

Demoscene is open closed community; it’s open because anyone can watch its productions (demo), access to its archive and participate its event (demoparty), yet it’s closed because it requires specific technical knowledge to actively join, truly appreciate the work and… to discover this culture initially. People are loosely connected, and though there is a website which has been considered to be a base (Pouet) there is no such thing as an authority to issue its membership card.

Then, what kind of people should we call “demosceners”?

Clearly there are various interpretations for this term, but from where I see it, you can’t call yourself “demoscener” just because you watch demos on YouTube or drank beer at demoparty. In this case, “demoscene fan” would be more suitable. To me, demoscener is someone who makes demo, helps organizing a demoparty or does something actively to get this culture going. Demoscener is an earned title. And, at least, these are my definition of “demoscener” in this post.



9.     It’s so diverse that no one shouts about “diversity”.

Majority of demosceners are 30-40s male from Europe, but this visible fact should not overshadow the diversity of this culture. Country, age, gender, color of skin, language, profession… Demosceners all come from different backgrounds and that’s just normal for them. They take this inclusive nature for granted that no one shout about the word “diversity”.

Demoscene is a community of interest and demosceners are connected through common passion for computer and art. No matter where you come from or who you are, as long as you share same interests and have respect for others, you will be welcomed.

Having said that, please remember that they won’t welcome you with big applause or wide open arms, but you’ll feel that the door quietly opens.



8. Most of them don’t consider themselves nerds, and we can’t really call them nerds either.

“I’m not a nerd.” I don’t know how many times I’ve heard this phrase while talking with and reading about demosceners. I didn’t ask “are you a nerd?” but they mentioned this spontaneously.

Generally speaking, a nerd refers to someone who has extreme interest in only one subject and is socially awkward. And many English dictionaries state that this “one subject” is computers. Demoscene is computer subculture and most of the people who drive this scene are naturally computer-savvy, so they don’t have problems accepting the description of “someone who has extreme interest in computers”. But when it comes to other two traits, which are “single-minded” and “socially inept”, they are hesitant to tick off.

To start with obvious reasons, they are not really single-minded since everyone I interacted with have many interests other than computers. And for sociability, demoscene has a built-in social feature called “demoparty” which is held all over the world and all year round. They bring their works, drink, mingle and exchange ideas with like-minded people. Although most of them are not the type of social butterfly, they socialize in their way and enjoy the companionship.

And there are other reasons why they don’t consider themselves nerds. For demosceners, computer is a tool to create art. They are interested in researching new technologies and deepening their knowledge of computers, but their biggest interest is to leverage them to express themselves in art form. So, from this point of view, “artist” might be more suitable than this n-word to describe them. And probably, they feel more comfortable to be called with that.



7. Their approach is practical and logical.

I just wrote that they are more like artists, but these artists are not the kind that spreads arms toward the sky and wait for magic or miracle to happen. They don’t let their emotion control their hands on the keyboard either. Their approach for the work is practical and reasonable.

This can be confirmed with production notes they release after the compo (competition). A lot of demosceners reveal the “making of” in the form of blog post, video or seminar held at demoparty. They usually share what technique and method they used, the process they took, and where they got the idea for the work.

With this production notes, you can see they rely on their accumulated knowledge, skills, experiences and steady work to create a piece, not a flash of inspiration or luck. If you ask demosceners how it’s made, they can explain it logically. They won’t say things like “because an angel whispered in my ear”.



6.     They discover their strength and learn to collaborate with others.

When we break down demosceners into more specific titles, we see programmers, graphic artists, designers, musicians, directors, organizers, presenters, DJs, diskmag editors.. and the list goes on. And many of them are wearing multiple hats.

They all started as an individual who's attracted by this culture for some reason, and by creating demos, joining demoparties and communicating with others (i.e. demoscene activities) they discover their strength in the scene and subsequently in the society. Some keep brushing up their skills, some find their potential in different roles, and some find other interests through demoscene.

And by discovering and recognizing their strength, they can start working with other people with different skillset or strength. They ask for help, discuss, understand each other's view/work style, manage the project and complete by the deadline. Through this process, they learn how to collaborate with other people.

When you look at the top class demo made by a group of different talents, you’ll see each of the group members shine through their own strength while complementing each other to create one demo. And if you ask them how the collaboration was, you’ll find there’s a mutual respect for each other.



5. They love challenges.

They really do. They love challenges so much that they set limitations for themselves to make the challenge harder. Challenge requires them to think deeply and solve problems, and in fact that’s what really excites demosceners and sparks their creativity.

How can I put all these stuff into 64KB? Or better yet, 4KB?

What’s the shortcut to do it?

How can I draw this scenery with only 5 colors?
What’s the alternative method to achieve similar results?

How can I convey this complex theme in 8 minutes?
What’s the most effective and beautiful way to show this technique?

How can we handle 300+ visitors with only 10 staffs?
What tools and system would be most useful?


Even when they’re not sitting in front of computers, they are always thinking and finding a way to solve problems. And they love doing this.



4. They learn to deal with criticism.

One of the unique things about demoscene is its feedback system. When you release a demo at demoparty, you will receive real-time feedbacks through audience reaction; you may hear joyous cheer, applause, boos, screams or horror - dead silence. At the same time, people who watch the compo on streaming are typing their comments on chat windows, twitter and forums. Then once the compo is over, your work is uploaded to the demoscene archive and YouTube, and you start receiving more detailed comments from demosceners, demo fans and general viewers.

Most of the comments are direct, and ones from demosceners are quite harsh because they know what you're doing. Some complement, some point out its technical flaw, some give you valuable advice and many throw dirt for many reasons. Even when you won first prize and the work is actually excellent, there will always be people who thumb down.


And through these feedback systems, demosceners learn how to deal with criticism; what to and what not to care, who to listen and who to ignore. They learn how to use them as a reference and motivation to create next demo. (They usually listen to the comments from fellow demosceners that they respect.)

But remember this. Demosceners tend to give aggressive remarks over the internet, but I found many of them are much milder and friendly in person.



3. They are oh-so competitive.

The culture of demoscene was born from the motivation to show off one's hacking skills in the 80's. And even after all these years and huge technical advancement, the essence of this culture remains intact. Demo is art, demo is self-expression, but as long as they call their stage "compo", demoscene is a place to show off and compete.

They want to show off what they can, they want to surprise viewers, they want to prove themselves, and they want their name on top of the list. Don’t be fooled by their nonchalant attitude, they are really competitive. And this is vital nature to drive the culture forward.

However, you need to know that demoscene is not a savage battlefield. Demosceners are competitive but they are able to appreciate others' work and acknowledge its excellence. They are rivals but also friends. And they know they have improved each other's skills by competing.



2.      It’s no magic, it’s no joke, they work really hard.

So now you know they want to win, but what do they do to accomplish that goal? The answer is simple; they work really hard. You might want to say “but these people are mostly professionals, so it should be very easy because they already have skills and access to resources and expensive tools”. I understand because I used to think that way, too. But the truth is, it wasn’t that easy.

Generally, demosceners need to work hard and tackle these 3 challenges before releasing demos:
1.    Find time
2.    Create a demo which can live up to their high standards
3.    Finish a demo


1.    Find time

They have a busy life, so they first need to find time to work on the demo. Many of them wake up early or go to bed late to make time, and some work at lunch time or work in a daily commuter train.


2.    Create a demo which can live up to their high standards

Most of the demosceners set high standards for their work, and they don’t want to release something that they are not feeling happy about. To meet these standards, demosceners try many different methods and go all the way. Some spent a large amount of time to master new techniques , some worked on the same project for several years to polish it, some brought together different talents to perfect every aspects, and some scrapped everything to start over. Probably, they are their own worst critic.

And if they aim higher spot on the ranking, addition to meet their own standards, they also need to care about the perspective of audience. Not just showing off their skills, top groups are always thinking about the way to present them. They consider who the audience is and how to entertain them. Some secrets were revealed in their interviews, so go check that if you want to know more.


3.    Finish a demo

Demosceners recognize this as the most difficult step in demomaking. They are already tired by this time, but they have to review the work and fix some issues which is not so fun to do. But this is critical process and it directly affects the outcome. A lot of them leverage the power of deadline to do this, and one group revealed that they locked themselves in a secluded country house to finish it.


And this hard working spirit can be found in demoparty organizers, too. They spend so much time to plan and prepare the event in order to make the party go smoothly. Ticketing, scheduling, funding, sound system, lighting, programs for sessions and compo, streaming, prizes… they make sure all is under control. If you could just relax and enjoy the party, that means there are people working hard for it.



1.       They are just doing what they love to do.

Competition motivates them to work harder and make the culture thrive, and the winning actually bring them a prize and fame among people in the same field. But still, that’s not strong enough to call “the engine” of demosceners.

It’s true that creating a great demo and winning a prize can add some sparkle on your resume, and it could bring you a first job or dream job in computer graphics industry. But most of the demosceners are already working in that field, so this cannot be the main reason to challenge themselves. And it’s not about the money either since what they usually receive is a trophy and small prizes, or modest cash prize which is far cry from eSports’.

The reason why they do all these things is obviously because they simply love to do it. No one ask them to sit up late and code or draw or adjust bass sound, but they do it spontaneously. No one force them to create demotools for efficiency, but they do it saying “I have to”. But no, this is not a job or obligation. They do it because they want to do it and they love to do it. For them, demoscene is a playground.

However you rarely hear this true motive from demosceners. In fact, they forgot about it. After spending some time in this culture, they no longer think about why they do all these stuff or wonder if they actually like it or not. At this point, they would just engage in demoscene activity as if that’s the most natural thing in the world. And before they knew it, voilà, they became demosceners.



----------------------------------------------------------------


A message for new explorers

Discovering demoscene was an accident. After all these years I still think that way. By peeking the world which is vastly different from what I’ve been, I’ve learned about different perspective and it also helped me understand myself.

If you are a person who just accidentally found out about this culture and got interested, have fun exploring, there’s way too many interesting things to see here. Hope yours will turn into a happy accident, too.


Thank you notes

Back in this spring, Zavie-san suggested me to speak about my perspective on demoscene at certain event. I eventually declined this for my selfish reasons (I’m sorry), but the ideas I came up with had stayed on me so I decided to share them in writing. So, thank you Zavie-san for the inspiration! (He’s going to talk about his demo in the upcoming Siggraph Asia in Tokyo. Check out his session if you’re going.)

And thank you all the demosceners who welcomed me at demoparties or interacted with me online, and the first demoscener I met (your name led me to this culture and look what happened). And obviously, big thanks to all the demosceners who accepted to do interviews. I don’t know about you, but it’s been a pleasure for me :)


Thank you for reading this to the end!



「デモシーナーとは誰なのか?」 ~デモシーナーへのインタビューから学んだこと~




このブログでもメインなのか?と思うほど頻繁に登場する話題ですが、ここ56年ほど、「デモシーン」という知られざるコンピューターのサブカルチャーに触れる機会に恵まれ、作品を見たり、国内外のイベントに参加したり、カルチャーの立役者的な方々にお話を伺ったりする機会に恵まれました。今回はその体験を振り返り、私のデモシーンに対する考えや、このカルチャーで学んだことについてお話ししてみたいと思います。

この記事ではカルチャー自体の説明は省きたいと思いますので、「デモシーンって何?」という方は、こちらのページをご覧ください。


デモシーンとの出会い

まず最初にお断りしておきたいのですが、私はコンピューター関係の人間でも、特にコンピューターに詳しい人間でもありません。仕事や趣味にコンピューターを使うことは多いのですが、CとかC++とかDとかいう名称のプログラミング言語とはまるで縁がなく、人間の読み書き話す言葉、つまり自然言語を使って仕事をしています。美しい言葉の表現に出会うと1日中でもうっとりとしていられますが、数列が出てきたら即退散!という人生を送ってきて今に至ります。プログラミングもできなければ、作曲もしないし、まともな絵も描けません。つまり、私はこのカルチャーにおいて完全に「アウェイ」な存在です。

そんな私が初めて「デモシーン」という単語に出会ったのは、かれこれ10年ほど前。このカルチャーの黄金期といわれる90年代に発行されたオンライン記事やメールマガジンでその存在を知りました。オンライン記事では、10代のコンピューターファンが集まって大いに盛り上がったという当時のイベントのレポートが紹介され、週刊のメールマガジンには、この10代の主に男子による制作日記、プログラムの解説、イベントの参加記など、青春をプログラミングに捧げた若者の日々が詰め込まれていました。

テキストを読む限り、彼らは起きている時間のほとんどをプログラミングに費やしているようで、「一体何者なんだ?」と思うと同時に、なぜここまで、まるで取り憑かれたようにプログラミングにのめり込めるのだろうと疑問を持ちました。正直なところ、最初はヤバイ人たちだと思いましたし、「これがいわゆるオタクってやつなのか、、」とも思いました。でも、記事として読んでいて面白かったのと、誰も彼もが本当に心から楽しんでいる様子がテキストから伝わってきて、もうちょっと知りたいかも、、と興味を持ったのが始まりです。

振り返れば、このカルチャーで最初に興味を持ったのは、デモの作品でも文化の歴史でもなく、この「デモシーナー」と呼ばれる不思議な人たちでした。


インタビューをはじめるまで

もう少し知りたいかも、と興味を持ったとはいえ、別に真剣にリサーチをするわけでもなく、ただ思い出したときやプログラミングの話題が耳に入ったときにググる程度のゆるーい探索を続けていました。このカルチャーに近い分野の記事や本を読んだり、デモ作品をYouTubeやパソコン、DOSエミュレーターで見たりはしたのですが、専門用語や技術面などでどうにも壁が多く、このカルチャーの全体像は見えないなと感じていました。怪しげなニックネームやグループ名、そして90年代を引きずった見た目のウェブサイトなども怖かったし、、。(ウェブ上にデモ作品の実行ファイルが置いてあると、そのページを開いたときにブラウザで「警告!」みたいのが表示されるのです。今なら理解できるのですが、当時は本当にトラップだと思ってビビっていました。そりゃそうよね。)

そんなことが何年も続いたある日、いつものように思い出してふんふんググっていると、ハンガリーで制作されたドキュメンタリー映画『Moleman 2 – Demoscene – The Art of the Algorithms』を見つけました。全編がYouTubeで公開されていたので早速見ると、デモシーンのことをまったく知らない人向けに作られていて、これが非常にわかりやすい!この文化を理解して楽しむために必要と思われる基本的な情報が90分間で説明されていたのです。歴代の名作といわれる作品もカバーされているので、気になったら映画を見たあとにすぐにチェックできるという素晴らしいものでした。初めてデモシーンと出会ったとき、「デモ作品っていうけど、いったいどこから何を見ればいいの、、」と思っていた私。あのときにこの映画みたいのがあったらなー!と強く感じたのと、制作者がいろんな言語の字幕を募集していたので、ちょうど翻訳者だし、私みたいな人の役に立てばと日本語字幕をつけることにしました。字幕が公開されるとTwitterで日本のデモシーナーの方からコメントをいただいたので、これは知りたかったことを聞ける良きチャンス!とばかりに質問をさせていただいたことからインタビューが始まりました。


インタビュー編集中の図


現在までにご登場いただいたデモシーナーの数は13名。日本はもちろん、世界のさまざまな国で活動中の皆さんにお話を伺いました。インタビューは1人を除いてすべてメールで行い、送った質問に答えてもらうという方法で進めました(1人は都合によりチャット)。流れを作るために編集はしましたが、メッセージや個性をなるべくダイレクトに感じてほしかったので、ご本人の言葉にはなるべく触れないようにしたつもりです。それから、あまり技術的な内容にならないようにも気をつけました。(なぜなら私が分からないので。)基本的には、私が楽しんで読めるものになればいいなーと思っていたのですが、思いのほかたくさんの方に楽しんでいただけたようで嬉しかったです。あるデモシーナーの「お母さんに良かったって言われた」っていうのが、いまのところ私の中では最高のフィードバックです(笑)


アウェイの人間から見たデモシーンの魅力について

何といっても、デモシーンの魅力は「デモ」と呼ばれるアート作品。デモとは実行ファイルのことで、このファイルをコンピューター上で実行することで、リアルタイムで生成される映像と音声を楽しめます。デモにはさまざまな最先端技術がふんだんに使われていますが、GPUとかレイトレーシングとか、そういった技術的な知識はゼロでも楽しめます。また、こう書くと制作者には怒られてしまうかもしれませんが(ごめんね)、ほとんどのデモはYouTubeにもアップされているので、作品をダウンロードすることなく鑑賞できます。(実際、メールやネットや文章・表計算などの用途で使うパソコンだと、YouTubeのビデオのほうが途切れずにキレイに見えるように思います。というか、標準的なものだと実行したときにPCが唸ります、、)

デモシーンはハードコアなプログラミングの世界なので、やはりガチで技術的な見た目の作品もありますが、ほとんどのデモ作品は、ミュージックビデオやアート&デザイン系の映像のように楽しめます。抽象的でありつつ、細かい部分まで作り込まれた映像は見ていて引き込まれますし、現代アートのように物事を別の角度から見たり、想像するインスピレーションになると私は思っています。普段コンピューターグラフィックスの世界から遠くにいるほど、意外性を感じるのではないでしょうか。

映像だけでなく、デモに使われている音楽も魅力のひとつです。ほとんどの音楽がそのデモ用に作られたものなので、耳からもその作品の世界観を味わえます。クオリティの高さもさることながら、そのジャンルの広さにも驚いていただきたい。ボーカル曲もあれば、ヒップホップも、ジャズも、サンバも、しっとりしたピアノ曲も、、。ただ、極めて個人的な印象をお伝えさせていただくとすれば、LFOとかSquarepusherとか、その流れの音楽が好きな方は特にチェックしてほしいなと思います。

そしてもう1つ、アウェイの人間から見た時にデモシーンの魅力と映るものがあります。それは、このカルチャーに関わる人々、つまり「デモシーナー」のこと。特にこの文化とはまったく縁がないと感じる人ほど、彼らの考え方やアプローチから多くのことを学べるように思います。


で、何を学んだのか

さて、デモ作品の魅力は実際に見て感じていただくとして、ここでは私がインタビューなどを通じてデモシーナーについて学んだことをトップ10方式でご紹介してみたいと思います。



私がデモシーナーについて学んだ10のこと



10. 「デモシーナー」という称号は、タダでは手に入らない。

デモシーンというカルチャーは、オープンでありながら閉鎖的なコミュニティです。オープンである理由は、誰でもデモ作品やアーカイブにアクセスできるだけでなく、デモパーティーと呼ばれるイベントにも自由に参加できることが挙げられます。ですが、このカルチャーに積極的に参加したり、デモ作品の真の価値を理解したりするためには専門的な知識が必要になります。というか、そもそも技術的な用語から検索していかないとカルチャー自体見つけられないので、そういう意味ではとても閉鎖的です。「Pouet」というデモシーンの総本山的なポータルサイトはありますが、連盟とか協会とか、カルチャー全体を統括したり、会員証を発行するような機関はありません。デモシーナーたちも仲間意識はあるようですが、基本的に非常にゆるくつながっているという印象です。

ところで、この「デモシーナー」という呼称ですが、これはどんな人のことを指しているのか。

この用語にはいろんな解釈があると思いますが、私が見てきた限り、YouTubeでデモを見たり、デモパーティーの会場でビールを飲んだぐらいでは「デモシーナー」を名乗ることは許されないと感じています。おそらく上記の場合、「デモシーンのファン」がより適切な表現になるのではないでしょうか。個人的な見解になりますが、デモシーナーとは、デモ作品を作っている人、デモパーティーの開催に関わっている人、またはこのカルチャーを存続させるために積極的な活動をしている人だと考えています。「デモシーナー」の称号は、自ら動いて手に入るもの。少なくとも、この記事のなかでは上の3つのいずれかに該当する人のことを「デモシーナー」と定義したいと思います。



9.   多様すぎて、誰も「多様性」を主張しない。

デモシーナーというと、ぱっと目につくのは3040代のヨーロッパ人男性。しかし、目に見える部分だけで片付けてはなりませぬ。このカルチャーには、国も年齢も違えば、性別、肌の色、言語、職業も違う、幅広いバックグラウンドを持った人々が集まっています。ですが、デモパーティーで隣に座った人物が自分とはまったく異なる背景を持っていることなんて、デモシーンの中では普通のこと。あまりに普通すぎることなので、誰も多様性の重要さを語りだしたりはしません。

デモシーンは同じ関心を持つ人々が集まるコミュニティであり、デモシーナーはコンピューターとアートに対する情熱を共有することでつながっています。あなたの出身がどこであろうと、あなたがどんな人間であろうと、共通の関心を持ち、他の人たちへの敬意を忘れない限り、このカルチャーは歓迎してくれるはずです。

まあでも、「歓迎」っていっても、拍手されるとか、「よく来たねー!」風に両腕を広げて迎え入れてくれるっていうのは期待しないほうがいいです。ただ、静かに入り口のドアが開くのは感じられるはず。



8. 自分たちをオタクだと思っていない、そして実際、定義通りのオタクでもなさそうだ。

「僕はオタクじゃないんで」 このセリフ、もう何度聞いたか分かりません!「アー・ユー・オタク?」と質問したわけでもないのに、デモシーナーとの会話中はもちろん、デモシーン関連の記事のなかにもバンバン登場します。

ここでの「オタク」とは、厳密に言えば「ナード(nerd)」のこと。ナードとは一般的に、1つの分野のみに極端に強い関心を持ち、社交性のない人を意味する言葉。そして多くの英語の辞書では、この「1つの分野」をコンピューターと明記しています。デモシーンはコンピューターのサブカルチャーですし、当然ここに集まってくるのはコンピューターに精通している人たちがほとんどなので、「コンピューターに極端に強い関心を持つ人」という部分に関しては、彼らもそれほど抵抗なく受け入れられるように思います。ただ、問題なのは「1つの分野のみ」と「社交性がない」という部分。どうやら、この2つの表現にデモシーナーは難色を示しているようなのです。

まず明らかな事実からご説明させていただくと、私がやり取りさせていただいた方全員が、コンピューター以外のさまざまな趣味や関心をお持ちでした。つまり、コンピューターだけに興味があるわけではないことになります。そして社交性に関しては、デモシーンには「デモパーティー」というソーシャル機能が組み込まれており、世界中のどこかで年がら年中開催されているデモパーティーを訪れては、作品を発表したり、同じ趣味の人々と飲んだり、交流したり、アイデアを交換したり、飲んだりしています。ものすごく社交的なタイプではありませんが、自分たちなりの方法で交流し、人付き合いの時間を楽しんでいます。

また、デモシーナーが自分たちのことをナードだと思っていないのには別の理由もあります。それは、彼らにとってコンピューターは目的ではなく、アートを生み出すためのツールだから。新しいテクノロジーを研究したり、コンピューターの知識を深めることにも興味はあるものの、彼らの最大の関心事は、学んだそれらの知識や技術をアートという形の自己表現に使うこと。つまり、この視点から見た場合には、ナードやオタクよりも「アーティスト」という呼び名のほうがしっくりくるわけです。たぶん本人たちも、そう呼ばれるほうがいいでしょうしね、、。



7. アプローチは実践的で論理的。

オタクというよりアーティストに近いと書きましたが、このアーティストは大空を仰いで奇跡や魔法が降りてくるのを待つタイプのアーティストではありません。髪を振り乱し、感情の赴くままキーボードを叩くということもないっぽいです。デモシーナーの作品へのアプローチは、いたって実践的かつ合理的です。

これを証明しているのが、彼らがコンポ(デモパーティーのコンテスト)の後にリリースするプロダクションノートというか解説の内容。多くのデモシーナーは、作品を発表したあとに制作の様子を綴ったブログ記事やビデオを公開、またはデモパーティーで開催されるセミナーで発表しており、一般的に、作品に使った技術やメソッド、制作のプロセス、そして作品のアイデアとなったものなどを紹介しています。

これを読めば、デモシーナーが一瞬のひらめきや運を頼りにするのではなく、蓄積された知識、経験、スキルに加え、地道な作業を通して作品を作り上げているのがよく分かります。「どうやって作ったんですか?」と質問すれば、デモシーナーはアイデアの段階から論理的に説明できる人たちです。面倒くさいと説明してくれないかもしれませんが、、少なくとも真面目な顔で「天使が耳元で囁いたから」とか、感覚的な回答をすることはないのです。



6. 自分の強みを見つけ、自分にはない強みを持った人たちと協力することを学んでいる。

「デモシーナー」と一口にいっても、厳密にはプログラマー、グラフィックアーティスト、デザイナー、ミュージシャン、ディレクター、オーガナイザー、プレゼンター、DJ、ディスクマガジンのエディターなどなど、非常に多くのカタカナの肩書、役割があります。そして大体の人が、複数の役割を兼任しているようです。

最初はみんな、「何らかの理由でこのカルチャーに興味を持った人」という立場からスタートするのですが、デモを制作したり、デモパーティーに参加したり、他の人と交流したりと、いわゆるデモシーンの活動を続けていると、デモシーン内外での自分の強みが自然と分かってくるようになります。このカルチャーの活動を通して自分の強みやスキルに磨きをかけ続ける人もいれば、当初考えていたのとは別の役割で力を発揮できる自分を発見したり、デモシーンの外に興味の対象を見つけたりする人もいます。ただ、私が見てきた印象だと、そのまま「あ、これって、デモシーン以外でも強みとして使えるかも!」と気付いて職業にしていくタイプが多いように思います。

そして自分の強みを発見、認識できると、自分とは違うスキルや強みを持った人たちとの共同作業がスタートできるようになります。アドバイスを求めたり、お互いの意見や作業スタイルを理解し合ったりしながら、プロジェクトを管理し締切までに作品を完成させます。このプロセスから、他者とのコラボレーションの方法を学んでいくのです。

さまざまな肩書を持つ人で構成されたデモグループの作品を見ると、それぞれのメンバーがお互いの力を補い合いながら、自分の強みを思い切り発揮しているのが分かると思います。こういうグループの人に制作の様子を聞いてみると、みんなお互いのスキルを尊重しあっているのが伝わってきます。



5. 挑戦が好きだ。自分を追い込むことが大好きだ。

もう大好きすぎて、挑戦に自ら制限を増やして、難易度を上げにいってるくらい。挑戦や課題には深く考えること、そして問題解決能力が求められます。そしてこれこそが、デモシーナーを興奮させ、彼らの独創性をスパークさせるものなのです。

「すべてを64KBのファイルに収めるにはどうしたらいいのだろう?いや、4KBのファイルにできれば理想だな
「そのための最短経路は?」

「この風景を5色だけで描くには?」
「同じような結果を得られる別の方法はあるのかな」

「この複雑なテーマを8分間で表現するには?」
「この技術を最も効果的かつ美しく見せる方法は何だろうか」

300人を超える来場者に10人のスタッフで対応するには?」
「いちばん役に立つツールとシステムは何だろう?」

コンピューターの前に座っていない時でも、デモシーナーは常に考え事をして課題を解決する方法を探しています。それが好きというか、もう無意識に頭がそう動いてしまうのです。



4. イヤでも厳しい批評に鍛えられる。

作品へのフィードバックのシステムは、デモシーンのユニークな特徴の1つです。デモパーティーで作品を発表すると、まずその場で見ている観客の反応を通してリアルタイムのフィードバックを得られます。歓声だったり拍手だったり、ブーイングだったり叫び声だったり、沈黙が続くことも、、(これは怖いぞ)。それと同時に、ネット上ではコンポをライブ配信で見ている人たちが、チャット画面やTwitter、掲示板などにコメントを書き込みます。そしてコンポが終わると作品がデモシーンのアーカイブとYouTubeにアップされるので、そこからさらに突っ込んだコメントをデモシーナーやデモファン、一般の閲覧者から受け取り続けることになります。発表して終わり、ということにはならないのです。

投稿されるほとんどのコメントは、びっくりするほど率直。特に、何をやっているのか理解できるデモシーナーからのコメントはかなり手厳しいものが多いです。褒めたり、貴重なアドバイスをくれる人もいますが、大概は技術的な欠点を指摘されたり、いろんな理由でけなされます。たとえコンポで1位をとったとしても、作品が本当に素晴らしいものだったとしても、必ず文句はつけられます。世界の縮図のようにも思いますが、まあ、、そういうものなんです。

ともあれ、デモシーナーはこのフィードバックのシステムを通じて批評との付き合い方を学んでいきます。どんな批評に耳を傾けるほうがいいのか、誰の意見を信頼すべきなのか、何を無視すべきなのか、など、フィードバックを参考資料やモチベーションとして次の作品に活かす方法を身に付けていくのです。(ベテランのデモシーナーに聞いてみると、カルチャー内でリスペクトしている人からの意見は聞いているという人が多かったです。)

あ、でも、ネット上では攻撃的な発言が多いデモシーナーですが、実際にお会いしてみると、文面よりもずっと穏やかな方ばかりでしたよ。



3. 一番じゃなきゃダメなんだ。

80年代、自分のハッキングスキルを自慢してやろうという若者たちの動きから始まったデモシーン。あれから数十年の時が経ち、技術は信じられないぐらいの進歩を遂げましたが、このカルチャーの本質は変わっていません。デモはアートであり、自己表現でもありますが、彼ら自身が作品の発表の場を「コンポ」、つまりコンテストや大会と呼ぶ限り、デモシーンはスキルを自慢し、競い合う場所なのです。

身に付けたスキルを見せびらかしたい。見ている人を驚かせたい。自分の実力を証明したい。そして、自分たちのグループの名前をリストのトップに載せたい。そう、デモシーナーは競争心が強いのです。「勝ち負けなんか気にしてないよー」といった態度に騙されてはいけません。この競争心が根底にあるからこそ、このカルチャーがここまで続いてきたのですから。

とはいえ、デモシーンは殺伐とした戦いの場でもありません。勝ちたい、トップに立ちたいと思っていても、他の人の優れたスキルは素直に評価し、素晴らしい作品には心からの拍手を送るような方が多い世界のように思います。ライバルであり、仲間。そして競い合ってきたからこそお互いのスキルが向上したのだと理解しています。素敵ですね。



2.   才能もあるのかもしれないけど、とにかくものすごく努力していることは間違いない。

さて、デモシーナーが勝ちたい気持ちをみなぎらせているということはご理解いただけたでしょうか。では、この「ナンバーワンになりたい、、!」という野望を実現するために、彼らは何をしているのか。答えはいたってシンプル、「すごい努力」です。まじで。「いやでも、この人たちってプロだからスキルはあるだろうし、必要なリソースとかお高いツールとかも使い放題なんでしょう?」そう思ったあなた、私もそう思っていたのでお気持ちはよく分かります。でも、それほど簡単なことでもなさそうで、、。

一般的に、デモを発表するまでの道のりには、特に努力が必要となる次の3つの山があるといわれています。
1.    制作時間の確保
2.    自分の中の高い基準をクリアできるデモを作ること
3.    デモを完成させること

1.    制作時間の確保

忙しい生活を送っている皆さんなので、まずはデモを作るための時間を見つけることが課題になります。早起きするか夜更かしして時間を作るという人が多いようですが、会社の昼休みに作業したり、毎日の通勤電車タイムを制作にあてるという方もいました。

2.    自分の中の高い基準をクリアできるデモを作ること

ほとんどのデモシーナーが自分の作品に高い基準を設けており、自分で納得できないものは発表しないと決めているようです。この高い基準を満たすため、彼らは試行錯誤を繰り返し、本格的な努力をします。新しい技術の習得に多くの時間を費やしたり、違う分野で活躍する人たちを集めて完璧を追求したり、数年間かけて作品に磨きをかける人たちも!また、気に入らないと思ったらそのデモは捨てて最初からやり直すという話も聞きました。たぶん、作ってる本人が、作品にいちばん厳しい目を向けているのかも。

ちなみに、コンポのランキングの上位を狙うなら、自分で決めた基準を満たすことに加えて、観客の視点を考慮することも必要になります。トップランクのグループは、スキルを見せつけるだけでなく、その見せ方にも常に気を配っています。観客のタイプや、彼らを楽しませる方法を模索しているのです。そのための秘訣はインタビューの中もいくつか登場していますので、気になる方はチェックしてみてください。

3.    デモを完成させること

これは、デモ制作の中で最も難しいステップとして認識されています。すでに疲労はマックスに近づいている状態で、作品を見直し、修正をするのは決して楽ではない作業。ですが、ここで手を入れるかどうかが作品の出来栄えにダイレクトに影響します。多くの人は締切の力を活用してやり切るようですが、人里離れた場所にある家に閉じこもって完成させるという缶詰手法を取るグループもいました。


この懸命に努力する姿勢は、デモの制作者だけでなく、デモパーティーの主催者やスタッフにも見て取れます。チケット販売、スケジュール、資金集め、サウンドチェック、照明、セミナーやコンポ用のプログラム、ライブ配信、賞品の準備などなど、イベントをスムーズに進行できるよう、計画と準備に余念がありません。デモパーティーに参加して何の不都合なく過ごせたとしたら、それは、背後にそのための努力をしている人たちがいるということなのです。



1.   自分が大好きなことをやっている。

コンポという戦いの場所は、デモシーナーの闘志をかき立て、カルチャーを前進させます。さらに、勝てば賞品だけでなく、同じ分野の人々からの評価や羨望の眼差しを得ることができます。勝ちたい!という気持ちはとても大きなエネルギー。でも、、これを「デモシーナーを駆り立てるエンジン」と呼ぶにはまだ力強さが足りないのです。では、デモシーナーの真の原動力とは何なのか。名声?それともお金なの?

実際のところ、素晴らしいデモ作品を作り、勝利を収めれば、履歴書にキラリと光る経歴を加えられます。これを踏み台にコンピューターグラフィックス業界の会社に就職したり、憧れの会社やポジションに転職することも夢ではないどころか、結構ふつうの話だったりします。ですが、ほとんどのデモシーナーはすでにその分野で仕事をしているため、これだけを目的としてデモを作っているとは言い難い。そして、たしかに優勝・入賞するとトロフィーや賞品、そして時には賞金がもらえますが、eスポーツのような巨額の賞金ではなく、、もう本当に「これで1杯やりなよ」程度のささやかな金額です。だから、お金のためにやっているわけでもないのです。

なぜデモシーナーがこれほどまでの時間と労力を費やすかといえば、それは単純に「好きだから」という答えに行き着くしかないでしょう。誰かに深夜までプログラミングしてくれとも、絵を描いてくれとも、ベースサウンドを調節してくれとも頼まれたわけでもないのに自主的にやってしまう。デモ制作を効率化するツールだって、なくても困ることはないくせに「作らなければ」とか言って、ちょっと嬉しそうに作っている。でもこれ、仕事でもなければ義務でもない。彼らは、ただそうするのが大好きだからやっているだけ。デモシーナーにとってこのカルチャーは、遊び場みたいなものなのです。

ただ、掘り起こさない限り、この「好きだから」というそもそもの理由をデモシーナーの口から聞くことはほとんどないでしょう。だって彼らはもう忘れてしまっているのですから。

ある程度の時間を費やすと、なぜこんなことをやっているのか、そもそも好きなのかどうかすら考えなくなります。この段階になると、デモシーンの活動は彼らにとって水を飲むように自然なことになっているのです。そして気が付いたときにはあら不思議、デモシーナーになっているのです。


--------------------------------------------------------

デモシーンを発見したばかりのあなたへ

私にとってデモシーンとの出会いはアクシデントのようなものでした。初めてこの言葉を聞いた日からもう何年も経ちますが、未だにそう思います。自分には縁遠いと感じる場所に短期間ながらも身を置くことによって、これまでは知らなかった視点や考え方を学べただけでなく、自分自身を知ることにも役立ちました。

このカルチャーを偶然に発見し、興味を持ち始めたばかりという方。デモシーンは見どころの多いカルチャーですので、ぜひ楽しんでチェックしてみてください。あなたのデモシーンとの出会いも、幸せなアクシデントになることを願っています。


ありがとうのコーナー

今年の春先、インタビューにも登場したZavieさんから、デモシーンについての考えを話してみないかというお誘いをいただきました。結局、私の勝手な都合でお断りしたのですが(ごめんなさい)、その時に浮かんだアイデアがずっと頭に残っていたので、こういう形で発表してみようと思った次第です。Zavieさん、お声がけいただきありがとうございました!(Zavieさんは、来月東京で開催されるSiggraph Asiaで自身のデモ作品についてお話しされるそうです。参加される方は是非チェックしてみてね)

また、デモパーティーやオンラインでお話を聞かせていただいた皆さん、デモシーンを知るきっかけをくださった方にも感謝申し上げます。そしてそして、インタビューを受けてくださったデモシーナーの皆さん、本当にどうもありがとうございました!



最後までお読みいただきありがとうございました!




Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...